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STINK BUGS IN CONNECTICUT

Posted by Freddie on March 2, 2019

BROWN MARMORATED STINK BUG

These pests are relatively new to the United States, first appearing in Pennsylvania in 1996 then spreading north into Connecticut and other Northeast states in the early 2000’s. The stink bug is more of an agricultural pest then anything else, feeding on many different ornamental plants and trees. In homes they come inside at the end of Summer beginning of Fall to overwinter then leave and mate in the Spring. These insects do not bite, sting, or spread any kind of diseases or pathogens. They will tend to the warmer areas of the home and tend to just hide out and sit tight until warmer weather arrives then they leave the structure.

HOW TO KEEP THEM OUT

The way to keep the stink bug from entering is by exclusion. Start your efforts in late August, seal any cracks or crevices around doors and windows, install new weather-stripping, door sweeps, and caulk any gaps in utility lines leading into your home.

HOW TO GET RID OF THEM IF THEY GET INSIDE

If your exclusion efforts weren’t done in a timely manner, or they just weren’t effective enough, then what? You can do a “catch and release” by picking them up on your hand or piece of paper and free them outside. You can always flush them down the toilet. Or you can just let them be, they will leave once the weather gets warm.

WHAT NOT TO DO

Don’t vacuum them up as they will release a defensive sent that is quite potent and you may have to replace your vacuum hose. Don’t leave any dead ones laying around or in cracks and crevices as this will invite other structure infesting insects that feed on other dead insects and can cause an infestation.

WHAT WE DO AT OUR HOUSE

We don’t mind them. I have gotten the kids to look at them as our “winter pets”. They tend to just hang around the fireplace and radiators to stay warm. They don’t move around too much, and there is way more that you cannot see then the ones you can see. They like to hide, so most likely you have more than you think, so why freak out because you see one or two. They don’t release their sent if you let them be, or even if you pick them up. So, we just let them spend the Winter inside then come Spring we help them out side to find a mate. The females will lay their eggs on the underside of leaves and the cycle starts all over again.

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CT Pest Control Association American Mosquito Control Association National Pest Management Association American Mosquito Control Association American Mosquito Control Association